January 5, 2013

Socrate is a work for voice and piano (or small orchestra) by Erik Satie

The three parts of the composition are:

  1. Portrait de Socrate (“Portrait of Socrates”), text taken from Plato’s Symposium
  2. Les bords de l’Ilissus (“The banks of the Ilissus”), text taken from Plato’s Phaedrus
  3. Mort de Socrate (“Death of Socrates”), text taken from Plato’s Phaedo

April 16, 2012
Plato says:
Some say the Muses are nine: how careless!
Look, there’s Sappho too, from Lesbos, the tenth.
Jules-Élie Delaunay, Sappho kissing her lyre

Plato says:

Some say the Muses are nine: how careless!

Look, there’s Sappho too, from Lesbos, the tenth.

Jules-Élie Delaunay, Sappho kissing her lyre

April 11, 2012
The object of love is not beauty, as you suppose, said Diotima. What is then, asked Socrates? Reproduction and birth in beauty. -The Symposium
 Paul Delvaux, Silent Night (1962)

The object of love is not beauty, as you suppose, said Diotima. What is then, asked Socrates? Reproduction and birth in beauty. -The Symposium

Paul Delvaux, Silent Night (1962)

April 7, 2012
these are days for those who cry. not from guilt, but from longing. matthew describes peter crying over jesus, so does bach, and durer. this description is part of a cluster of motifs summoned in literary descriptions of martyrdom of cultural heroes. jesus’ death is held up by the passover, and he is embalmed before death, and the rooster’s crow is climactic. all this harks back to the tale of socrates, whose death is held up by the boats coming in for the festival, who bathes ritually before death, and whose last words mention the rooster of asclepius. foremost, peter’s weeping echoes the weeping of this entourage of socrates.
every hero has a wardrobe of attributes and that wardrobe includes a death story of mythical proportions.
 Jacques-Louis David, The Death of Socrates (1787)

these are days for those who cry. not from guilt, but from longing. matthew describes peter crying over jesus, so does bach, and durer. this description is part of a cluster of motifs summoned in literary descriptions of martyrdom of cultural heroes. jesus’ death is held up by the passover, and he is embalmed before death, and the rooster’s crow is climactic. all this harks back to the tale of socrates, whose death is held up by the boats coming in for the festival, who bathes ritually before death, and whose last words mention the rooster of asclepius. foremost, peter’s weeping echoes the weeping of this entourage of socrates.

every hero has a wardrobe of attributes and that wardrobe includes a death story of mythical proportions.

Jacques-Louis David, The Death of Socrates (1787)

March 4, 2012
"You know Phaedrus, that is the strange thing about writing, which makes it truly correspond to painting.
 The painter’s products stand before us as though they were alive,
 but if you question them, they maintain a most majestic silence. 
It is the same with written words; they seem to talk
to you as if they were intelligent, but if you ask them anything
 about what they say, from a desire to be instructed,
 they go on telling you just the same thing forever."

— Plato

4:58pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z50jGxHTg8j4
  
Filed under: Plato Phaedrus 
October 21, 2011
"if anyone comes to the gates of poetry and expects to become an adequate poet by acquiring expert knowledge of the subject without the muses’ madness, he will fail, and his self-controlled verses will be eclipsed by the poetry of men who have been driven out of their minds."

— plato, phaedrus, 245a

8:26am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z50jGxAxB0sx
  
Filed under: plato phaedrus 
September 29, 2011
"only in the contemplation of beauty in human life worth living."

— plato

5:09am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z50jGxA3qvTS
Filed under: plato beauty 
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